Frequently Asked questions

What is the Crisis Center? Who do you work with?

Marta’s House/Klamath Crisis Center has been serving victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, and human trafficking for over 30 years. We work to support victims however they may need- by providing shelter, with support during a SANE visit, help filling out restraining orders, navigating the DHS or court systems, or whatever else a victim may need to be able to find safety. 

What is Domestic Violence?

Domestic violence is a pattern of coercive, controlling behavior that can include physical abuse, emotional or psychological abuse, sexual abuse or financial abuse (using money to exert control). Some abusers can have control without ever using physical violence. Domestic violence is a dangerous, and affects people from all walks of life. Domestic violence does not discriminate by age, socioeconomic background, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, or ability. 


Abusive partners make it very difficult for victims to escape relationships. Sadly, survivors may endure domestic violence for years. It is important for survivors to know that the abuse is not their fault, and that they are not alone. Help is available to those who are experiencing domestic violence.


If you are interested in scheduling a domestic violence training, call our office at (541) 850-8939.

Are you confidential?

Marta's House advocates are all certified confidential advocates, meaning we've fulfilled the required advocacy trainings in compliance with OAR 137-085.  We have not only the privilege, but the legal obligation to protect victims' confidentiality. 


We recognize a survivor’s right to their information- to choose when it is shared, not shared, with whom, and for what purpose. What does this mean? We'll never share what you tell us with your family, friends, or any other agency unless you explicitly ask us to. In this case, you are able to sign a release of information, which you can revoke whenever you would like. 

Why do victims stay with abusers?

Victims’ reasons for staying are incredibly complicated. Abusers go to great lengths to make the victim feel as though they cannot leave, and leaving is often the most dangerous time for a victim. 


In attempting to leave, the victim may face a wide array of barriers, not limited to: 

  • The abuser will become increasingly physically violence, even lethal, when the victim attempts to leave. 
  • A lack of, or unsupportive, friends and family. 
  • Knowing how hard it will be to be a single parent, and the effects of separation on children. The victim may also fear that they will lose custody, or that the abuser will harm the children. 
  • The victim feeling that the relationship is a mix of good times, love and hope along with the manipulation, intimidation and fear.
  • The victim may not have a way to access safety or resources, or feel as though they have nowhere to go. 
  • Victim may not have the means to support themselves or lack of access to cash, bank accounts, or assets. 
  • Religious or cultural beliefs and practices may not support separation/ divorce. 

Do you help with protection orders?

We do! As advocates, we don’t give legal advice. However, you can come to our office, we’ll talk you through the process, help you fill out the packet, and support you during the court hearing. 

Do you have support groups?

We do. Our support group topics and schedules change regularly. For a current list of offerings, call our office!

Do you accept donations?

We rely heavily on community donations! However, our needs change based on our clients’ needs. We can always use things like diapers, baby formula, but for the most updated information or to schedule a donation, please call our office at (541) 850-8939.